Home

WIH

is a digital and public history project at the University of Texas at Austin. Its purpose is to allow the public access to the rich resources available at UT regarding the collection of donated nineteenth and twentieth-century Navajo rugs. This site aims to be a resource for educators, students, and researchers by hosting a repository of digital collections, contextualizing blog posts, lesson plans, classroom activities,  and a platform for respectful collaboration and discourse. That being said, it should also become a place for conversations around decolonizing the archive, and the long-lasting effects of American colonization of Native land. I have intentionally chosen to frame this site around the Navajo and their creations in an effort to recenter the discussion of their culture and commodity production around them. While collectors and traders are described, the true purpose of this project is to diversify conversations about Navajo textiles to include them. I hope that I have not done violence to the meanings they intended to impart

 

THE COLLECTION.png

 

 

 

 

The Documents

Screen Shot 2018-04-22 at 2.47.00 PM

Digitized materials are available through a partnership with the Art and Art History Department at the University of Texas at Austin. Several of the digitized rugs and blankets are on a rotating exhibit at the Blanton Museum.  (See American West exhibit)

Screen Shot 2018-04-24 at 9.58.29 PM

Continue reading “The Documents”

The Navajo

Screen Shot 2018-04-22 at 2.47.00 PM

“Spider Woman instructed the Navajo women how to weave on a loom which Spider Man told them how to make. The cross poles were made of sky and earth cords, the warp sticks of sun rays, the healds of rock crystal and sheet lightning. The pattern was a sun halo, white shell made the comb. There were four spindles: one a stick of zigzag lightning with a whorl of cannel coal; one a stick of flash lightning with a whorl of turquoise; a third had a stick of sheet lightning with a whorl of abalone; a rain streamer formed the stick of the fourth, and its whorl was white shell.” (Navajo Legend)

Continue reading “The Navajo”

Project History

Screen Shot 2018-04-22 at 3.50.52 PMbegan as the final project for a graduate level Public and Digital History course at the University of Texas at Austin under Dr. Joan Neuberger. The mission of “Woven into History” is to allow the public access to the rich resources available at UT regarding the collection of donated nineteenth and twentieth-century Navajo rugs. This site aims to be a resource for educators, students, and researchers by hosting a repository of digital collections, contextualizing blog posts, lesson plans, classroom activities,  and a platform for respectful collaboration and discourse.I have intentionally chosen to frame this site around the Navajo and their creations in an effort to recenter the discussion of Navajo culture and commodity production to include. While collectors and traders are described, they are not the focus of this site. However, I am aware the contents of this site reveal more about the archival process and the collector, F.A. Williams, than they do the creators of the beautiful, creative works present. Much is yet to be done to deconstruct the impact of the colonial nature of the archive on indigenous peoples, but I hope this is a step in the right direction.

Continue reading “Project History”